Wyoming Landscapes - The Prairie Life Zone

The draw grows from a line. Imagine the line traced by a raindrop as it zigzags down a pane of glass - pulled by gravity, it follows the path of least resistance, turning left when it's harder to turn right. Now it does not matter if the rain lands on glass or the side of a hill, the choice is the same: the easiest way down. A drop of water bumps into many things on its fall down the hill, and the pushing and shoving helps clear a small path ... click here for the full excerpt

The draw grows from a line. Imagine the line traced by a raindrop as it zigzags down a pane of glass - pulled by gravity, it follows the path of least resistance, turning left when it's harder to turn right. Now it does not matter if the rain lands on glass or the side of a hill, the choice is the same: the easiest way down. A drop of water bumps into many things on its fall down the hill, and the pushing and shoving helps clear a small path. Because drafting behind others is easier than going it alone, the trail-blazed path becomes the best choice when it is stumbled upon by other waterdrops wandering the slope. Soon, the solitary descent of a raindrop's first run becomes the well trodden route known as a rill. As familiarity on the hillside increases, one rill commutes with another and a channel begins. The merging continues until the seed of the line has grown to a draw.

With its course mapped out, the work of the draw begins: mining the earth and transporting its ore.

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Just click a thumbnail to enlarge one of these Wyoming prairie life zone images in its own individual frame and you can view the general location where each photograph was taken and use navigation icons to move through the image gallery.